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Microsoft forcing Windows 7 and 8.1 users to install Windows 10

The company is blocking Windows 7 and 8.1 updates on system powered with new processors. Technology giant Microsoft is blocking Windows 7 and 8.1 updates on Intel's seventh generation Core i3, i5 and i7 AMD's seventh generation processor (Bristol Ridge) and Qualcomm's 8996 processors. While trying to scan and download updates through Windows Update, error messages appear saying, "Windows could not search for new updates" and "code 80240037 Windows Update encountered an unknown error." As explained in Microsoft Knowledge based article the errors occur as the new processor generations require the latest Windows version. For those on Windows 7 and 8.1, Microsoft recommends updating the devices to Windows 10. In response to the matter a Microsoft spokesperson told the Forbes, "As new silicon generations are introduced, they will require the latest Windows platform at that time for support. This...

Make Windows 10 Stop Downloading

If you want a really simple and easy way to get rid of the “Get Windows 10” icon and stop your PC from downloading Windows 10, you can download a little piece of freeware called GWX Control Panel from a developer that isn’t happy with this nonsense either.

Download it, run it, and then click the “Disable Get Windows 10 App (permanently remove icon)” button. And then click the “Disable Operating System Upgrades in Windows Update” button too for good measure. Screenshot_11_2_15__9_03_PM You’ll have to reboot, but at the end, the icon will be gone and your computer shouldn’t get the upgrade. And luckily you can click those buttons again to put things back the way they were....

WinServer 2003 end of support is only days away: What CISOs should do

CISOs have learned to resist the siren call of vendors when they issue new versions of software, understanding that added capabilities have to be needed to justify the expense. However, there’s a point when venerable applications have to be cast aside. But it appears that organizations are still taking chances by running hardware with Windows Server 2003, although Microsoft will stop issuing security patches next week. In April, integration firm Avanade — which is partly owned by Microsoft — issued a study showing that half of Canadian firms still had at least one server running the OS, and there’s no reason to believe that number is in single digits now. That doesn’t mean they are running critical systems in production, but it’s still a risk. So here’s a reminder: The last critical security patches will be issued July...